Browse Resources by Type: Translation Paper

Translation Paper
20 Pages
2003
A team of writers with public health and smart growth expertise observe that in recent years, sprawling development patterns have drawn increasing scrutiny because of their potential negative impacts on public health. The authors give examples of promising practices to promote health through smarter growth policies and practices, and provide useful funder references on the topic.
Translation Paper
12 Pages
2002
Sam Passmore of the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation describes how the trend toward building new schools on large sites far from existing development centers—called “school sprawl” or “school giantism”—can have far-reaching impacts on school children, school districts, and the larger community.
Translation Paper
16 Pages
2002
David Goldberg of Smart Growth America explains how the efforts of funders to lift up disadvantaged children, youth, and families have been subverted by sprawling development patterns. Evidence is mounting that sprawl is also taking a toll on middle class children and families. The author contends that the smart growth movement offers a rare opportunity to unite the interests of both.
Translation Paper
16 Pages
2001
Authors Don Chen and Nancy Jakowitsch argue that current transportation policies are not moving toward improved community outcomes. They discuss the origins and achievements of the transportation reform movement, the current “tipping point,” and steps that can translate this potential into monumental change.

   < 1 2

Translation Paper
20 Pages
2003
Writer Tony Proscio describes why the community development and smart growth movements have tended to diverge, and how they might come together around a more effective, common vision. He gives examples of community development projects that have taken shape in explicitly “smart” deliberations with regional authorities and planners.
Translation Paper
24 Pages
2002
Gloria Ohland and Hank Dittmar, writing for the Great American Station Foundation, argue that the greatest threats to biodiversity are habitat loss and degradation, and invasive species—all of which are strongly correlated with sprawl. Smart growth policies alone will not provide the solution, but combined with “smart conservation” they can provide for both more development and more habitat protection.
Translation Paper
16 Pages
2001
Deborah Howe of Portland State University posits that the sprawling, automobile-dominated landscape prevalent throughout the U.S. seriously limits the continued mobility and independence of older people. She advocates transforming our communities so that they are aging-sensitive, making it possible for people to maintain their health and independence even as needs change.
Translation Paper
12 Pages
2001
Edward Thompson, Jr. of American Farmland Trust explains how the sustainability of American agriculture is being compromised as more and more land is lost to sprawling development. This loss accelerates as public policies favor development over agriculture. Successful protection programs are hybrids that combine substantial financial incentives to landowners with effective land use regulation.